Slide Show: Aung San Suu Kyi’s Public Life Since Release from House Arrest

by Khet Mar    /  September 17, 2011  / No comments

The following slide show highlights significant moments in the public life of Burmese pro-democracy Aung San Suu Kyi’s since her release from house arrest on November 13, 2010.


A Burmese opposition politician and the General Secretary of the National League for Democracy, Aung San Suu Kyi’s party won 59% of the national votes and 81% (392 of 485) of the seats in Parliament in 1990 general election. She had, however, already been detained under house arrest before the elections. She remained under house arrest in Burma for almost 15 of the 21 years from 20 July 1989 until her release on 13 November 2010.

“The universal human aspiration to be free has been brought home to us by recent developments in the Middle East. The Burmese are as excited by these events are as people elsewhere”
- Aung San Suu Kyi, BBC radio interview (June 28th 2011)

Aung San Suu Kyi received the Rafto Prize and the Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought in 1990 and the Nobel Peace Prize in 1991. In 1992 she was awarded the Jawaharlal Nehru Award for International Understanding by the Government of India and the International Simón Bolívar Prize from the government of Venezuela. In 2007, the Government of Canada made her an honorary citizen of that country, one of only five people ever to receive the honor. Aung San Suu Kyi is the third child and only daughter of Aung San, considered to be the father of modern-day Burma.

About the Author

Khet Mar is a staff writer at Sampsonia Way. A former writer-in-residence at City of Asylum/Pittsburgh, Khet Mar is a journalist, novelist, short story writer, poet, and essayist from Burma. She is the author of one novel, Wild Snowy Night, as well as several collections of short stories, essays and poems. Her work has been translated into English and Japanese, been broadcast on radio, and made into a film. In the fall of 2007, Mar was a visiting fellow at the International Writing Program at the University of Iowa.

View all articles by Khet Mar

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