Ethiopiques
Why does a country with her own unique alphabet and long history of writing persist to deny citizens the right to freedom of expression in this era of Expression? No other country in Africa may typify this paradox more than Ethiopia. As Leopold Senghor's famous collection of poems entitled "Ethiopiques" remained 'powerful and popular' so does the source of his intriguing title, Ethiopia, in her own ways. In "Ethiopiques", I share Ethiopian views on pertinent issues related to journalism, culture and, of course, the overarching subject of politics.
Mesfin Negash is an Ethiopian journalist living in exile in Sweden. He is one of the journalists accused of "terrorism" in 2011 by the Ethiopian government. The co-founder and first editor-in-chief of an acclaimed Ethiopian newspaper, Addis Neger, he is currently the Managing Editor of Addisnegeronline.com. He is a political science student by training and known for his critical commentaries on significant political and social issues.
  • photo via Flickr user: Rod Waddington
    Writing from Prison

    Despite the number of political prisoners in my country, we know very little about letters or poems written in Ethiopia’s prisons, as very few of them are published.

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  • A computer lab in Mekelle University, Ethiopia.
    Territorial Righteousness

    In his column this week, Exiled Ethiopian writer Mesfin Negash dissects “territorial righteousness,” the idea that one has less right to citizenship, less information, less understanding, and less sympathy to national issues because one lives in exile.

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  • A child bowing at the body of Meles Zenawi. Photo provided by the author.
    Farewell and Farce-well to a Dictator

    Journalist Mesfin Negash examines the effect that PM Meles Zenawi’s death has had on Ethiopia. Negash highlights how state media has manufactured the image of national grief, blurring the lines between private and public mourning.

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  • A silent protest held on July 27th at the Grand Anwar Mosque in Addis Ababa. Photo: youtube user Sefir Islam.
    Silence is Loud

    For eight months Ethiopian Muslims have been protesting against the government’s interference in the Ethiopian Islamic Affairs Supreme Council. Journalist Mesfin Negash examines the ways in which the government has suppressed protesters and religious freedom.

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Fearless, Ink.